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IP Status in Saskatchewan?

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IP Status in Saskatchewan?

BooksBeat

Member
Jun 1, 2020
9
7
Hi guys,

A friend of mine has been living in Saskatchewan for more than 3 years. Yesterday, he told me that he wants to know the requirements for getting an in-province (IP) status for the MD program at the University of Saskatchewan. According to him, he has checked their website but couldn't get any tangible information. If you are familiar with Alberta and Newfoundland, you will know that none of your years can be in full-time studies. Also, let's assume he has finished his undergrad and wanna move to either Alberta or Newfoundland for just a year, how possible is it for him to get an in-province status and, if possible, will he be eligible to apply for the IP status with his out-of-province undergrad (of course, with the prerequisite courses)?

Thanks
 
Last edited:

sprinkles

Member
Jun 1, 2020
10
7
Hi guys,

A friend of mine has been living in Saskatchewan for more than 3 years. Yesterday, he told me that he wants to know the requirements for getting an in-province (IP) status for the MD program at the University of Saskatchewan. According to him, he has checked their website but couldn't get any tangible information. If you are familiar with Alberta and Newfoundland, you will know that none of your years can be in full-time studies. Also, let's assume he has finished his undergrad and wanna move to either Alberta or Newfoundland for just a year, how possible is it for him to get an in-province status and, if possible, will he be eligible to apply for the IP status with his out-of-province undergrad (of course, with the prerequisite courses)?

Thanks
Waooo, what a nice idea? Dude, I think you know that each province has its requirement for the IP status? The requirements for residency status is not uniform across all the Canadian provinces. So, I suggest you check the website for the requirements of IP status for your preferred province.
 

BooksBeat

Member
Jun 1, 2020
9
7
Waooo, what a nice idea? Dude, I think you know that each province has its requirement for the IP status? The requirements for residency status is not uniform across all the Canadian provinces. So, I suggest you check the website for the requirements of IP status for your preferred province.
Thanks for your comment. I am fully aware that the requirements for each province differs. Prior to my post, I made a research on some provinces and I discovered that all provinces with the exception of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland allow full-time study to count for in-province status. However, i couldn't get enough information as regards Saskatchewan which I want. So, I just want advise from someone who has done this before or who has someone who did this in the past.
 

BooksBeat

Member
Jun 1, 2020
9
7
Sorry guys, I made a mistake in my first post. For Alberta, some years of your fulltime studies count towards your IP status. It is only Newfoundland and Nova Scotia that do not allow full-time study to count for IP Status.
 

Breacche

Member
Jun 1, 2020
15
3
When I checked both the acceptance rate and average statistics of those that gained admission to Saskatchewan med school, I can confidently say that Sask IP is, by far, the easiest place to get into Canada. To buttress what you said in your question, you can do an undergraduate studies there and get IP status. To be candid, doing an undergrad at Saskatchewan is the best way to exponentially increase your chances of admission. There was a time when Sask allowed IP to apply for med school after 2 years of undergraduate studies. I know two people who did this then and they got in Sask Med school.

Clearing my throat!

Let me shock you, the University of Saskatchewan does not place so much emphasis on extracurricular activities, volunteering, research, or internships. They value good academic grade but still give room for people with average result, in some cases. In 2016, the average MCAT of the students that were accepted was 501. If you doubt this, you can check the Sask acceptance rate on their website and read more on their admission policy.

I have heard of someone who scored 496 in MCAT and had 76% GPA but was accepted into Sask med school. This is really jaw dropping because most schools in other provinces do not even accept people that has better score than this.

So, I can beat my chest convincingly that USask med school is easier to get into and you can get an IP status easily.
 

DeluxeVegan

Member
Jun 1, 2020
13
8
When I checked both the acceptance rate and average statistics of those that gained admission to Saskatchewan med school, I can confidently say that Sask IP is, by far, the easiest place to get into Canada. To buttress what you said in your question, you can do an undergraduate studies there and get IP status. To be candid, doing an undergrad at Saskatchewan is the best way to exponentially increase your chances of admission. There was a time when Sask allowed IP to apply for med school after 2 years of undergraduate studies. I know two people who did this then and they got in Sask Med school.

Clearing my throat!

Let me shock you, the University of Saskatchewan does not place so much emphasis on extracurricular activities, volunteering, research, or internships. They value good academic grade but still give room for people with average result, in some cases. In 2016, the average MCAT of the students that were accepted was 501. If you doubt this, you can check the Sask acceptance rate on their website and read more on their admission policy.

I have heard of someone who scored 496 in MCAT and had 76% GPA but was accepted into Sask med school. This is really jaw dropping because most schools in other provinces do not even accept people that has better score than this.

So, I can beat my chest convincingly that USask med school is easier to get into and you can get an IP status easily.

What a great explanation!

To me, it is really embarrassing that USask stoops so low to attract students for its med school.
Moreover, I found it so odd that such a fool proof plan by USask has no regulations, risks, or limitations binding it. This is where the problem comes in, I personally know of two people who, after getting their IP status through USask med school, left the school at the second or third year. Damn! This will have a negative impact on the province as there is a decrease in the number of physicians in the province.
 

Breacche

Member
Jun 1, 2020
15
3
What a great explanation!

To me, it is really embarrassing that USask stoops so low to attract students for its med school.
Moreover, I found it so odd that such a fool proof plan by USask has no regulations, risks, or limitations binding it. This is where the problem comes in, I personally know of two people who, after getting their IP status through USask med school, left the school at the second or third year. Damn! This will have a negative impact on the province as there is a decrease in the number of physicians in the province.
 

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Marvelous

Member
Jun 6, 2020
8
6
As for me, i think we shouldn't look down on USask because it gives room for people with low or average score. USask understands that there are some reasons that might make one to have low GPA or MCAT score, USask values DIVERSITY so much. Let's be real here, marks do not generally determine who will be a better physician or not. it depends on an individual commitment and ability to rise when you are down. I met a guy last year in Ottawa, he gained admission into UofS med school with 80% average and and 23rd percentile MCAT. He performed so well at med school and he is working with one of the best hospitals in the Nation's capital.

Basing your judgement on scores alone is so ridiculous and painful.
 

DeluxeVegan

Member
Jun 1, 2020
13
8
@Marvelous, please kindly correct me if I am wrong. Not only does USask select those with low scores, they don't even care about your ECs or volunteering experiences. So tell me, how they want to train people with inadequate capacity for med program, which is one of the toughest courses in the world.

IMO, I don't think that is diversity. If truly they value diversity, then they should have adjusted their admission requirement in such a way as to ONLY admit people with exceptional academic background or people with strong ECs or volunteering experiences. Well, they can complement their "DIVERSITY" with some reserved seats for rural and indigenous applicants. I can't say how many seats USask do reserve for their indigenous applicants. They have to do this because there is a higher chance that people that were born and bred in Saskatchewan will likely stay in the province to practice.

There are tons of statistics that suggest that lowering the admission requirements for students only give room for lower competitiveness. Thus, making the school to mostly churn out less competent graduates.
 

MusicCzar

Member
Jun 1, 2020
7
8
I love this thread so much.

I would like to hear from an Ontarian that went to USask for an undergraduate studies and used it to gain IP status for med school. What are your experiences? Do have any path that you will recommend or you recommend this path? Is it so difficult to do well at USask?

Thanks for your responses. I will show this chat to a friend.
 

Guitarist

Member
Jun 1, 2020
11
6
I love this thread so much.

I would like to hear from an Ontarian that went to USask for an undergraduate studies and used it to gain IP status for med school. What are your experiences? Do have any path that you will recommend or you recommend this path? Is it so difficult to do well at USask?

Thanks for your responses. I will show this chat to a friend.
Nice one. I am also interested in having answer to these questions. One of my cousins loves USask so much and it is his top choice. He wants to use USask to get IP status but he needs to be sure of the process before he jets out to Saskatoon for no reason.
 

Claudio

Member
Jun 1, 2020
6
4
As for me, i think we shouldn't look down on USask because it gives room for people with low or average score. USask understands that there are some reasons that might make one to have low GPA or MCAT score, USask values DIVERSITY so much. Let's be real here, marks do not generally determine who will be a better physician or not. it depends on an individual commitment and ability to rise when you are down. I met a guy last year in Ottawa, he gained admission into UofS med school with 80% average and and 23rd percentile MCAT. He performed so well at med school and he is working with one of the best hospitals in the Nation's capital.

Basing your judgement on scores alone is so ridiculous and painful.
Hello, let me come in here. I personally know of some people that have high GPA, excellent MCAT scores, wide ECs, volunteering, and internship experiences, and some of them have more than one degree. Despite their enviable achievements and profile, they have been denied admission to some Canadian medical schools. Some of them have even applied for more than two or three times.These people have everything it takes to become a great physician but the system shuts them out every year. Honestly, I can't believe you said that applicants with low GPA, low MCAT and also, little or no ECS can make a good physician. They do not have enough mental capacity or academic strength to sail through the medical profession. Even if the USask medical school examinations are easy to pass, what about them competing with other physicians from other Canadian schools? Do you think they will outperform their counterparts?

I believe in DIVERSITY but it can never be defined on the sentiment of low scores. If you have low score and have exceptional ECs, there is higher chance that you have issue when you where preparing for your exam, so med school will consider that and give you a second chance to prove yourself. However, you have average or low academic strength with no ECs, you are not fit for medical school.
 

snowflake

Member
Jun 1, 2020
14
11
Well, I also support DIVERSITY but it can never come from a student with low GPA, low MCAT and no ECs. If you look at it critically, USask might have another method for grading their applicants.

Some people have good academic records but are rude, or cannot communicate properly, or lack some interpersonal skills which might mar their reputation in the future. These schools foresee all these and reject the students as early as possible, irrespective of how excellent their profiles might look.

A friend told me a story of a physician who is brilliant but lacks good communication skills. Ahhh!!! The Nurses run the ER for him. So, I believe USask would have tested the applicants on some qualities which we might not know.
 

snowflake

Member
Jun 1, 2020
14
11
In fact, diversity isn't necessarily good academic records or exceptional ECs, it could be in form of reserving some seats for students from rural areas or poor family background, who didn't have enough support to unleash their potentials.

USask do offer five seats for DSAAP and six seats for Aboriginal applicants, as at 2018. In 2018, only two people were accepted into USask med school with a 75-80% average and I am very sure that USask has other factors they considered for accepting these candidates. The median was 84 - 86%

Some students are really brilliant, but they have no resources to support their education. Hence, they scored low in their MCATs and other relevant exams.
 

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